ISSN: 2522-9176
An MRSA Infection in a Diabetic Patient Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
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Abstract

Gall bladder empyema secondary to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is a very rare occurrence that was scarcely reported. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It's tougher to treat than most strains of staphylococcus aureus, or staph, because it is resistant to some commonly used antibiotics. Garden-variety staph are common bacteria that can live on our bodies. Plenty of healthy people carry staph without being infected by it. In fact, 25-30% of us have staph bacteria in our noses.

However, staph can be a problem if it manages to get into the body, often through a skin compromise. MRSA has become a major problem worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality (D.Q.A. Nguyen and N.I Ramus). Teranishi et al reported a case of acute cholecystitis caused by MRSA in the Japanese literature. No prior such cases were reported.

References

1. D.Q.A. Nguen and N.I. Ramus. A fatal case of MRA Septicemia and Gallbladder Empyema, International Journal of Surgery, 2004; 2: 120-121
2. Donald Graham, Keith Wichterman. Toxic Shock syndrome Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Technique, 2002; Volume 12, 143-146
3. Teranishi T. and Oleamoto Y. A case of toxic shock syndrome and acute cholecystectomy caused by MRSA. Journal of Gastroenterology, 2002; 99: 165-169
4. Spicer J. Clinical bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology. Churchill Livingston, 2000
5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Selected notifiable disease reports, United States, comparison of provisional 4-week total ending December 27, 2007, with historical data. MMWR, 2001; 49:1159
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Keywords

MRSA
diabetes complication
post-surgical complication
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